Connie Terwilliger – ISDN Voice Talent

March 2, 2011

Conversational Read? Sure – What Flavor?

Filed under: Auditioning, Techniques — Tags: , , — connieterwilliger @ 3:40 pm

We get it all the time in casting directions these days – the client wants a conversational read. They specifically tell you that a non-announcer read required.

But what flavor of conversation do they want? There are a lot of different ways to be “conversational.” Just listen to real people have a conversation. In fact, record yourself having conversations with different people.

(It might not be a good idea to record your conversation with the phone company after your phone lines have been down for 3 days. Or your call to the power company after the hot switch of the meter blew out your dishwasher and microwave. Although there are probably copies of those calls and if you run for public office they will surface.)

A lot of the nuances in just what conversational style will be right will come from the particular script you are reading, but Pam Turlow recently blogged about this subject and listed a few specific conversational “styles” that should help your taste buds get warmed up for your next non-announcer read.

http://pamturlowvo.blogspot.com/2011/03/what-is-conversational-voice-over-read.html

Advertisements

1 Comment »

  1. Hi Connie — thanks for taking time to read my blog — and to respond to this. Because there are as many types of convesational reads as fish in the sea. Thanks for the tip for all! Best — Pam

    Comment by Pam Turlow — March 2, 2011 @ 3:48 pm


RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: